E CLAMPUS VITUS

What say the brethren?

Yee…

Randamn Clamper designs I threw together…

Per caritate viduaribus orphanibusque, sed prime viduaribus._________________________________________The Ancient and Honorable Order ofE Clampus Vitus ® E Clampus Vitus is both a Historical and Fraternal organization.Although ancient in origin, it reached its peak during thetumultuous days of The Great California Gold Rush.A member of E Clampus Vitus is commonly called a “Clamper.”The latter-day members of this organization attempt to upholdthe traditions of fellowship, good spirits, and fun.Like their forbearers, the modern Clampers are dedicatedto the care and protection of the Widow* and the Orphan.* But especially the Widow.________________________________________E CLAMPUS VITUS: Who are we? Some Californians are Elks, others are Moose, and some are even Lions. But the most colorful of them all are the Clampers, members of the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus (ECV), a fraternal organization founded back in the gold rush days. It all began as a spoof on other lodges and secret societies, and its early history is a little difficult to reconstruct. The early meetings of E Clampus Vitus in the California gold fields were devoted so completely to drinking and carousing that none of the Clampers was ever in any condition to keep minutes, let alone remember what had happened the next day! By tradition, a person could join E Clampus Vitus by invitation only and then was expected to endure an elaborate, humorous and sometimes grueling initiation ceremony. Membership in E Clampus Vitus declined in the late 1800s, but experienced a revival in the 1930s and is still going strong today. Modern-day Clampers typically dress up in garb reminiscent of the gold-rush — usually a red miner’s shirt, and black hat — and they still hold their unique initiation ceremonies, but now specialize in putting up commemorative plaques of historical and hysterical interest. Along with serious sites that need more reverent commemoration, Clampers have been known to plaque places like saloons, bawdy houses, and other locations that have been “overlooked” by more serious historical societies. Pull to the side of the road in California to read a monument and as often as not, you will discover that Clampers had something to do with its erection.Lots of folks don’t know what to make of the Clampers today, but we think Carl Wheat, one of the three founders of the revived Order back in the thirties, put it well when he described E Clampus Vitus as “The comic strip on the page of California History.”As the new millennium begins, there are thousands of Clampers in forty-two chapters in California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Colorado. There are even two new Outposts of our august organization in Oregon and Washington. Since the early nineteen-thirties, well over two thousand historical sites have been “plaqued” with historical markers by ECV.What does E Clampus Vitus mean? Well, that is a great mystery. Ask a Clamper.What is the purpose of the society? The objectives of ECV are well known: Members swear to take care of the Widows and Orphans — especially the Widows._______________________________________E CLAMPUS VITUS: Can I be a Clamper? The prime requisites to becoming a Clamper are a good sense of humor, an interest in Western history, an open mind, and a cast iron stomach. If a man has those qualities, and strikes up a friendship with a Clamper or two, he may find himself taken in to (and by) the Ancient and Honorable Order. But one can’t simply walk up and say, “Can I be a Clamper?” It is for the Brethren of ECV to invite prospective members to join. And if a man is asked, he should know that the invitation is only given once. If it is refused, it is never tendered again. But a man of any intelligence and character so invited would hardly be likely to turn down such a signal honor. And remember, as the Brethren of E Clampus Vitus maintain, Clampers are not made, they’re born. Like gold, they just have to be discovered.Credo quia absurdum. _______________________________________Mountain Charlie No.1850 is a California non-profit Historical- Educational corporation, registered with the State of Calfornia.We are classified by the IRS as a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3).Donations to Mountain Charlie No.1850 can generally be deducted from the donor’s Federal (and often state) income tax.Please consult with your tax advisor about your specific situation.® “E Clampus Vitus” and “ECV” are registered trademarks of E Clampus Vitus, Inc. and are used by expressed permission.All Rights are reserved.

Per caritate viduaribus orphanibusque, 
sed prime viduaribus.

_________________________________________

The Ancient and Honorable Order of
E Clampus Vitus ® E Clampus Vitus is both a Historical and Fraternal organization.
Although ancient in origin, it reached its peak during the
tumultuous days of The Great California Gold Rush.

A member of E Clampus Vitus is commonly called a “Clamper.”
The latter-day members of this organization attempt to uphold
the traditions of fellowship, good spirits, and fun.

Like their forbearers, the modern Clampers are dedicated
to the care and protection of the Widow* and the Orphan.

* But especially the Widow.


________________________________________


E CLAMPUS VITUS: Who are we? Some Californians are Elks, others are Moose, and some are even Lions. But the most colorful of them all are the Clampers, members of the Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus (ECV), a fraternal organization founded back in the gold rush days. It all began as a spoof on other lodges and secret societies, and its early history is a little difficult to reconstruct. The early meetings of E Clampus Vitus in the California gold fields were devoted so completely to drinking and carousing that none of the Clampers was ever in any condition to keep minutes, let alone remember what had happened the next day! 

By tradition, a person could join E Clampus Vitus by invitation only and then was expected to endure an elaborate, humorous and sometimes grueling initiation ceremony. Membership in E Clampus Vitus declined in the late 1800s, but experienced a revival in the 1930s and is still going strong today. Modern-day Clampers typically dress up in garb reminiscent of the gold-rush — usually a red miner’s shirt, and black hat — and they still hold their unique initiation ceremonies, but now specialize in putting up commemorative plaques of historical and hysterical interest. Along with serious sites that need more reverent commemoration, Clampers have been known to plaque places like saloons, bawdy houses, and other locations that have been “overlooked” by more serious historical societies. Pull to the side of the road in California to read a monument and as often as not, you will discover that Clampers had something to do with its erection.

Lots of folks don’t know what to make of the Clampers today, but we think Carl Wheat, one of the three founders of the revived Order back in the thirties, put it well when he described E Clampus Vitus as “The comic strip on the page of California History.”

As the new millennium begins, there are thousands of Clampers in forty-two chapters in California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Colorado. There are even two new Outposts of our august organization in Oregon and Washington. Since the early nineteen-thirties, well over two thousand historical sites have been “plaqued” with historical markers by ECV.

What does E Clampus Vitus mean? Well, that is a great mystery. Ask a Clamper.

What is the purpose of the society? The objectives of ECV are well known: Members swear to take care of the Widows and Orphans — especially the Widows.


_______________________________________


E CLAMPUS VITUS: Can I be a Clamper? The prime requisites to becoming a Clamper are a good sense of humor, an interest in Western history, an open mind, and a cast iron stomach. If a man has those qualities, and strikes up a friendship with a Clamper or two, he may find himself taken in to (and by) the Ancient and Honorable Order. But one can’t simply walk up and say, “Can I be a Clamper?” It is for the Brethren of ECV to invite prospective members to join. And if a man is asked, he should know that the invitation is only given once. If it is refused, it is never tendered again. But a man of any intelligence and character so invited would hardly be likely to turn down such a signal honor. And remember, as the Brethren of E Clampus Vitus maintain, Clampers are not made, they’re born. Like gold, they just have to be discovered.

Credo quia absurdum. 

_______________________________________


Mountain Charlie No.1850 is a California non-profit Historical- 
Educational corporation, registered with the State of Calfornia.

We are classified by the IRS as a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3).
Donations to Mountain Charlie No.1850 can generally be deducted from the donor’s 
Federal (and often state) income tax.
Please consult with your tax advisor about your specific situation.


® “E Clampus Vitus” and “ECV” are registered trademarks of 
E Clampus Vitus, Inc. and are used by expressed permission.
All Rights are reserved.


Being as I was born and raised in Alameda County, I thought I’d pay homage to Chapter 13 - Joaquin Murrieta. I’d like to retread one of these days. What say the brethren?


JOAQUIN MURRIETA - Legend/History


Everything about Joaquin Murrieta is disputed. He was either the Mexican Robin Hood or the El Dorado Robin Hood. He was either an infamous bandito or a Mexican patriot. He was born in either Alamos or Trincheras, in either Sonora Mexico or Quillota Chile.
He was either descended from Cherokee ancestors who migrated to Chile in the late 18th century, or a noble Spanish landowner. He either sympathized with Native Americans or with Mexicans.
An undisputed truth about Joaquin Murrieta is that he was born in 1829 and made his way to California in 1850, seeking to mine for gold. Legend says that he, his wife and his brother were attacked by American miners who envied his success and hated Mexicans. Talk about sore losers, they not only raped his wife, they hanged his brother, and horsewhipped the innocent Joaquin to a bloody pulp.
Murrieta tried to do the right thing and sought redress in the California courts, but was thwarted because Mexicans were prohibited from testifying against white men.
Seeking vengeance outside the law, Murrieta formed a gang, hunting down and killing six culprits. His outlaw band was named The Five Joaquins: Joaquin Botellier, Joaquin Carrillo, Joaquin Ocomoreniaq, Joaquin Valenzuela and Joaquin Murrieta. There was a sixth member, Manuel Garcia, affectionately dubbed Three-Fingered Jack.
In the Sierra Nevadas, they rustled cattle and horses, robbed banks, and murdered no fewer than 19 men. California governor, John Bigler, got plenty mad about this and created the California State Rangers, led by Captain Love, who had the task of finding the gang for a paltry $150 per month. A bounty of $5,000 was offered for Murrieta.
On July 25, 1853, an encounter between the Rangers and the gang ensued, killing Murrieta himself, and Three Fingered Jack. The Rangers must’ve been pretty bloodthirsty, because they stuck Garcia’s three-fingered hand and Joaquin Murrieta’s head in a big jar filled with brandy to preserve their trophies. They displayed the jar over Northern California, spectators paying one dollar each. (Note: The jar was lost in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.)
A year after the head and the hand event, legends about Murrieta began in earnest with San Francisco newspapers and even a book telling the story which had unleashed the fury of Five Joaquins and one Garcia in their quest for revenge.
History and legend ultimately came together creating Murrieta’s posthumous reputation as a Robin Hood fiercely avenging injustices against Mexicans.
His legendary life has been the subject of songs, novels, plays, and even the first Russian rock opera. Murrieta’s story can also be seen in motion pictures like The Robin Hood of El Dorado and The Mask of Zorro.
Not a bad legacy for a man about whom so many facts are disputed.

Being as I was born and raised in Alameda County, I thought I’d pay homage to Chapter 13 - Joaquin Murrieta. I’d like to retread one of these days. What say the brethren?

JOAQUIN MURRIETA - Legend/History

Everything about Joaquin Murrieta is disputed. He was either the Mexican Robin Hood or the El Dorado Robin Hood. He was either an infamous bandito or a Mexican patriot. He was born in either Alamos or Trincheras, in either Sonora Mexico or Quillota Chile.

He was either descended from Cherokee ancestors who migrated to Chile in the late 18th century, or a noble Spanish landowner. He either sympathized with Native Americans or with Mexicans.

An undisputed truth about Joaquin Murrieta is that he was born in 1829 and made his way to California in 1850, seeking to mine for gold. Legend says that he, his wife and his brother were attacked by American miners who envied his success and hated Mexicans. Talk about sore losers, they not only raped his wife, they hanged his brother, and horsewhipped the innocent Joaquin to a bloody pulp.

Murrieta tried to do the right thing and sought redress in the California courts, but was thwarted because Mexicans were prohibited from testifying against white men.

Seeking vengeance outside the law, Murrieta formed a gang, hunting down and killing six culprits. His outlaw band was named The Five Joaquins: Joaquin Botellier, Joaquin Carrillo, Joaquin Ocomoreniaq, Joaquin Valenzuela and Joaquin Murrieta. There was a sixth member, Manuel Garcia, affectionately dubbed Three-Fingered Jack.

In the Sierra Nevadas, they rustled cattle and horses, robbed banks, and murdered no fewer than 19 men. California governor, John Bigler, got plenty mad about this and created the California State Rangers, led by Captain Love, who had the task of finding the gang for a paltry $150 per month. A bounty of $5,000 was offered for Murrieta.

On July 25, 1853, an encounter between the Rangers and the gang ensued, killing Murrieta himself, and Three Fingered Jack. The Rangers must’ve been pretty bloodthirsty, because they stuck Garcia’s three-fingered hand and Joaquin Murrieta’s head in a big jar filled with brandy to preserve their trophies. They displayed the jar over Northern California, spectators paying one dollar each. (Note: The jar was lost in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.)

A year after the head and the hand event, legends about Murrieta began in earnest with San Francisco newspapers and even a book telling the story which had unleashed the fury of Five Joaquins and one Garcia in their quest for revenge.

History and legend ultimately came together creating Murrieta’s posthumous reputation as a Robin Hood fiercely avenging injustices against Mexicans.

His legendary life has been the subject of songs, novels, plays, and even the first Russian rock opera. Murrieta’s story can also be seen in motion pictures like The Robin Hood of El Dorado and The Mask of Zorro.

Not a bad legacy for a man about whom so many facts are disputed.

Emperor Norton Day…

(Source: youtube.com)

A Clamper branding……Ecv 58 (by DavidRacher)

58 HOLDING IT DOWN!

Matuca Fall Doin’s 2007 (by ECV1849)

T-Shirt design I created for a 4-Skin Doins… I never got off my ass to approach any Hawkers to print them. Maybe next time around… What say the brethren?

E Clampus Vitus on Man v. Food (by GuitarLicksAnonymous)

if you aint plaquen you ain't clampin...